Tuesday, 28 August 2018

BLOG BLITZ: Finding Eva - J. A. Baker


Eva is desperate to find her birth parents after spending her childhood in foster care. She leaves London and heads to Whitby in search of her mother and father, after breaking up with her boyfriend, Gareth.

Gareth is furious with Eva. He loved her deeply and the disclosure she made when she ended the relationship is eating away at him.

Celia, Eva’s friend, is concerned about Eva. She has stopped answering her calls and when Celia goes to London to find her, she realises Eva has moved without telling anyone. Celia makes the decision to follow Eva to Whitby, concerned that Eva is unravelling. Both women have been damaged by their childhoods.

When Gareth also decides to go to Whitby, it is the start of a lethal situation. 

Who exactly is Eva and why is Celia so concerned?

Some relationships are toxic. Others are deadly.


What did I think?

Finding Eva is J.A. Baker's fourth novel and I found myself horrified that I seem to have missed one, something I shall need to rectify immediately.  It is only 18 months or so since J.A. Baker released her debut, Undercurrent, so it is amazing that she is currently working on her fifth novel.  What a writing machine!  So I couldn't wait to see what Finding Eva is all about.

Eva has left London and headed North to find her birth parents.  Eva has left under a cloud after breaking up with her boyfriend, Gareth, and not telling her best friend, Celia, that she was leaving.  So Gareth and Celia follow Eva to Whitby, both of them desperate to find Eva for very different reasons.  Gareth could kill Eva for what she did to him, and he just might if he gets his hands on her, but what did she do?  I certainly couldn't read fast enough to find out!  Celia, meanwhile, is quite another matter and she really creeped me out.  She sees herself as Eva's soul sister as they were both brought up in care, but with similarities in appearance, it is clear that Celia doesn't just want to be like Eva, she wants to be her.  Creepy!

With Gareth and Celia chasing down Eva, the story is told from these 3 different perspectives.  Each character has their own motivations which taints their point of view so it's up to the reader to decide which one is nearest to the truth.  I really felt for Eva as she just wants to meet her birth parents and find out why they gave her away but, after reading the first chapter, I also worried whether she had some ulterior motive for visiting Whitby.

There's always a keen sense of place in J.A. Baker's novels and Finding Eva is no exception, set on the cold and wet cobbled streets of Whitby, a little fishing village in North Yorkshire.  The setting seems to add to the suspense as Eva finds nowhere to hide, despite there being plenty of narrow alleyways and lots of people visiting during the famous goth weekend.  

I found this book a little darker and more menacing than J.A. Baker's previous novels but there is so much suspense that it's virtually impossible to put down.  Finding Eva is chilling, suspenseful, dark and menacing; it's another superb book by J.A. Baker.

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:


Buy it from Amazon



About the author:

J. A. Baker is a writer and reader of psychological thrillers. She was born in the North East of England too long ago to mention and has four children and a grandchild.
Her first book, Undercurrent, was published by Bloodhound Books in December 2017. Two more books followed – Her Dark Retreat and The Other Mother, all of which made it into the Amazon Kindle Top 100.
She still resides in the North East with her husband Richard and dog, Theo. She lives in a village in County Durham. In her spare time, she enjoys reading, gardening and meeting up with friends and family.
She is working on her fifth book which will be published in December this year.

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Sunday, 26 August 2018

Mozart: The Man Revealed - John Suchet


The story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's life is well known. Austrian-born to a tyrannical father who worked him - fiercely; unhappily married to a spendthrift woman; a child-like character ill at ease amid the aristocratic splendour of the Viennese court; a musical genius who died young thus depriving the world of future glories.

Yet only that last point is really true. In this comprehensive biography, John Suchet examines the many myths and misunderstandings surrounding the world's best-loved composer. From his early days as a child prodigy performing for the imperial royal family in Vienna to the last months of his short life, driven to exhaustion by a punitive workload, one thing remained constant: his happy disposition.

Through trials and tribulations, grand successes and disheartening setbacks, Suchet shows us the real Mozart - blessed with an abundance of talent yet sometimes struggling to earn a living. His mischievous nature and earthy sense of humour, his ease and confidence in his own incredible abilities; these were traits that never left him. His music has brought comfort to countless generations; his life, though brief, is no less fascinating.


What did I think?

I would not be surprised to find out that either John Suchet is 250 years old or he has a time machine, as I felt as if he knew Mozart personally whilst reading his completely spellbinding book entitled Mozart: The Man Revealed.

As a regular listener to Classic FM, I look forward to Mozart Mondays as nothing is better at setting you up for the week ahead than the jollity of Mozart's compositions.  I always find myself humming or whistling along without even realising it, completely unaware of the stories that lie behind the child prodigy and his famous works.  

I have previously read and enjoyed John Suchet's fantastic book on Johann Strauss, but this book goes one step further as we really get to know the young composer through his own words by examining letters that he and his father wrote home whilst on tour.  The young Mozart is every bit the precocious child we imagine but he also had the most amazing sense of humour, often without a filter which would place him on the autistic spectrum today.  

As well as Mozart's sense of humour, John Suchet's fabulous sense of humour comes through in his writing.  I won't spoil the whole book but there is a particular painting of Mozart and his sister, Nannerl, who has the most gigantic hair, that makes me chuckle just thinking about it.  Mozart's humour is definitely what we could call 'toilet humour' as he is very rude and just doesn't care less.  Listening to his work after reading this book seems to add a new dimension, as I feel as if I can now effortlessly tap into the feelings that are woven into each exceptional piece of music.

An absolute must-read for any classical music fan, where you can really get to know the man behind the music in Mozart: The Man Revealed.  It is so authentic and fascinating that it could easily be called Mozart: In His Own Words.  Think you know Mozart?  Think again!

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:




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Thursday, 23 August 2018

BLOG TOUR: The Great Unexpected - Dan Mooney


“If you’re going to end it, you better make it big. No slipping off bridges, it’s undignified for men of our vintage. Go big or don’t bother.”
Joel lives in a nursing home and he’s not one bit happy about it. He doesn’t like being told when to eat, when to sleep, when to take his pills. In fact, he doesn’t like living at all, and he’s decided he’s going to end his life on his terms.
When he tells retired soap-actor Frank about his dark plan, Frank urges him to go out with a bang. Together, they embark on a mission to find the perfect suicide, and along the way, discover the strength of friendship when you really feel alone.

What did I think?

Well this book was an unexpected surprise; it really is unexpected by name and unexpected by nature as I laughed, smiled and cried my way through this beautiful story of growing old disgracefully.

Joel isn't exactly everyone's favourite Grandad; he's miserable, argumentative and disruptive and just wants to die to put an end to his misery.  Joel is imprisoned in a nursing home and he's clearly still grieving for his wife Lucey, whose bed is now occupied by another resident.  The only positive for Joel is that his roommate, Mr Miller, is unconscious so Joel is left in peace to wallow in his misery...until the day that Mr Miller checks out and a new roommate moves in.  

Frank De Selby or Frank Adams, depending on which persona he adopts, is like Joel's personal antidepressant and we know Joel doesn't like taking his pills.  Frank is so virile, flamboyant and outgoing that it isn't long before Joel is swept along on an adventure that he will never forget.  Frank is a very clever chap as rather than talk Joel out of his suicide mission, he vows to help him come up with the perfect suicide.  I think he knew fine well from the start that he would show Joel that life is worth living after all.  I was in kinks of laughter as the pair hatched an escape plan that enabled them to escape from the nursing home and gallivant around town.  What a night on the town they had...it sounded better than any nights out that I have ever had.

My heart swelled with emotion as I saw Joel's fractured relationships with his daughter and grandchildren gradually being repaired.  Joel had been so caught up in his own grief that he couldn't see that his family were grieving too, but together they could help each other through this difficult time.  It's amazing yet sad to think that if Lucey hadn't died, Joel would never have met Frank and he would never have unearthed the love that his family have for him.  Fate is a cruel mistress sometimes but dying is unfortunately a part of life.

As disgruntledly charming as Ove, The Great Unexpected's Joel Monroe is my new favourite grumpy old man.  I laughed and cried at Joel and Frank's escapades but more than anything, they taught me a very valuable lesson: you only get one shot at life, so you have to make the most of it.

The Great Unexpected is one of those ageless books that appeal to both young and old and I would absolutely love to see this made into a film.  To see Frank and Joel strutting their stuff on the dancefloor would be absolute comedy gold.  I'm definitely going to read this book again and I can see it becoming one of my go-to books when I'm in need of a pick-me-up.  I am completely astounded at how uplifted I felt by this book; evoking such surprising emotions, it really is perfectly named as The Great Unexpected.

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:


Find out more at Legend Press

Buy it from Amazon



About the author:

Dan Mooney is a writer, air traffic controller and amateur filmmaker, with one of his short films broadcast on national TV. Dan is also a fan of amateur dramatics, rugby and is a friend to many cats. He wrote his first piece of fiction for a child-operated local newspaper at age ten and has been writing ever since.
He is the author of Me, Myself and Them (June 2017) and The Great Unexpected (2018).
Follow Dan on Twitter @danielmoonbags


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Wednesday, 22 August 2018

BLOG TOUR: Before Her Eyes - Jack Jordan

She can't see the killer

But the killer can see her...

Naomi Hannah has been blind since birth. Struggling with living in a small, claustrophobic town, Naomi contemplates ending her life. But then she stumbles across the body of a young woman who has been brutally murdered. She senses someone else there at the scene - watching her. Naomi may not be able to see the killer's face, but she is still the only person who can identify him.

As the police begin hunting the person responsible and more victims are discovered, Naomi is forced to answer the question on which her fate hangs: why did the killer let her live?

In a town this small, the murderer must be close, perhaps even before her very eyes...


What did I think?

Jack is back in the most eagerly anticipated book of the year!  There's nothing unusual about booklovers getting excited about books, but a new Jack Jordan book seems to whip us up into a frenzy as we all clamour to get our names on this exclusive list of early readers.  I've been a huge fan of Jack Jordan since reading his outstanding debut, Anything for Her, and it's wonderful to follow the journey of this super-talented young author as he heads towards his destiny at the top of the bestseller chart.  

I don't know where Jack Jordan gets his ideas from but they're all such good ones and Before Her Eyes is an absolute cracker!  It sounds simple with a blind woman being pursued by a killer she can't see but the descriptions of smell, sounds and touch were so visual that I felt as if my own senses had been heightened to cope with Naomi's blindness.  Jack Jordan is always so attuned to his characters that he can replicate their thoughts and feelings in the reader, without us even realising it.  Whilst reading Before Her Eyes I found myself noticing smells and sounds more than usual as I tried to empathise with the darkness in which Naomi lived.  

Although Naomi is understandably a very flawed character, she is a lot tougher than she thinks.  Naomi will always have strong feelings towards her ex-husband, Dane, as he saw her at her worst and naturally, Naomi feels safe with him.  As a blind woman, there's one thing that her other senses can't compensate for and that is the looks of admiration that Naomi receives from lovely DS Marcus Campbell.  Now this really is love at first sight but unfortunately Naomi can't see it and my heart broke for Marcus as had to be content with admiring Naomi from afar.

The story of the killer terrorising Naomi's town reminded me of spiderweb cracks on a mirror; as you follow one line of enquiry and end up at a dead end, you have to return to the centre to see where the story leads you.  At the centre of this web is a cold case: that of young Hayley Miller whose body has never been found.  Marcus is convinced that this recent spate of killings is linked to the Hayley Miller case but his boss doesn't share the same thoughts.  Marcus does a bit of digging on his own and finds that the latest victims were investigating the Hayley Miller case so he seems to be on the right track but, with a killer determined to stop the truth getting out about Hayley Miller, nobody in this town is safe.

I can guarantee that you will be glued to every single page of Before Her Eyes.  I read it so fast that I feel like I need to read it again at a much slower pace to fully appreciate the glorious, visual scenes painted by Jack Jordan's powerful words.  An absolutely sublime piece of fiction that entertained, amazed and down-right thrilled every inch of me.  A* - you're top of the class again, Mr Jordan!

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:




Buy it from Amazon


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Tuesday, 21 August 2018

BLOG BLITZ: The Last Plantagenet? - Jennifer C. Wilson


The fireplace hadn't looked like a time-portal. 

All Kate had wanted was a fun, relaxing day out, watching the knights jousting at Nottingham Castle. What she ended up with was something quite different. 

Transported in a heartbeat from 2011 to 1485, how will Kate handle life at the Ricardian court? Even more importantly, how will she cope when she catches the eye of the king himself?


What did I think?

As a fan of Jennifer C. Wilson's Kindred Spirits series, I couldn't wait to dive into The Last Plantagenet? and with such a brilliant opening line shown on the front of the book, I knew straight away that it was going to be a good one!  It's a short story so it only took me about an hour to read it but it left me with a lovely warm feeling that I can still conjure now by just thinking about the book.  It's a timeslip story so we meet an historical figure in his own time period, rather than the ghosts in modern day settings that we encounter in the Kindred Spirits books.

Kate is wandering around Nottingham Castle during a War of the Roses re-enactment when the heavens open.  She heads inside to shelter from the rain and finds herself standing before the old kitchen fireplace.  Before she knows it, she finds herself transported to 1485 and into the kitchen of King Richard III's court.  Mistaken for a kitchen maid, she ends up serving the king, just as fate intended.  As soon as Richard claps eyes on Kate he makes his intentions clear and the pair end up embarking on a love affair that is so beautfully romantic that I even found myself falling in love with King Richard a little bit myself.  Kate reminded me of Cinderella as she is elevated from kitchen maid to lover of the king, and many little girls' fantasy (ok, mine) of meeting a handsome prince is fulfilled.

As Kate counts down the days to the 22nd August and the infamous Battle of Bosworth Field, she tries to warn Richard but a ghostly monk appears to make sure that she doesn't alter history.  Kate must stand by and watch Richard ride to his death whilst she embarks on her return to 2011, along with some treasured gifts that Richard bestowed on her.

Jennifer C. Wilson gets to play out her ultimate fantasy in The Last Plantagenet? and her love for Richard III shines through every page.  Jennifer is a one woman quest to right the wrongs that Richard III has suffered over the years as she attempts, and succeeds, to scrub out the image of the hunchbacked child killer that the Tudors painted.  

The Last Plantagenet? is a beautiful love story that stands the test of time as Kate meets her prince, despite living 526 years apart.  This spellbinding, imaginative romance is pure escapism written by Richard III's number one fan and I absolutely adored it.  The Last Plantagenet? is going on my 'to be read again' pile.

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:


Buy it from Amazon




About the author:
Jennifer is a marine biologist by training, who developed an equal passion for history whilst stalking Mary, Queen of Scots of childhood holidays (she since moved on to Richard III). She completed her BSc and MSc at the University of Hull, and has worked as a marine environmental consultant since graduating. 

Enrolling on an adult education workshop on her return to the north-east reignited Jennifer’s pastime of creative writing, and she has been filling notebooks ever since. In 2014, Jennifer won the Story Tyne short story competition, and also continues to work on developing her poetic voice, reading at a number of events, and with several pieces available online. Her Kindred Spirits novels are published by Crooked Cat Books and available via Amazon.



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Monday, 20 August 2018

BLOG BLITZ: The Edge of Sanity - Chris Thomas


In a derelict squat, the Smart Man watches as the new narcotic developed by his shadowy organisation wreaks havoc on it unsuspecting victims. The drug is now ready for sale on their exclusive darknet market place.

Elsewhere, DCI Robert Smith, the retired head of the Cyber Crimes Unit, seeks out crime boss Curtis Slater at his remote farm. He offers to provide Slater with information in exchange for money. But what information is he offering?

Meanwhile, former detective Pete Harris had started a new life, away from the Cyber Crimes Unit, with his daughter and begins to rekindle his relationship with old colleague Grace Brooks.

With his life seemingly complete, Pete’s world comes crashing down as he is drawn into Slater’s game with fatal consequences. He must join forces with his old enemies in a race against time. But can Pete save his daughter and Grace from the clutches of Slater, the Smart Man, and the sinister ring master, the Professor?

A dark psychological thriller.


What did I think?

Wow!  What an amazing follow up to Enter the Dark.  I didn't think it was possible, but The Edge of Sanity is even more gruesome in places and Chris Thomas made my stomach clench yet again.  You could definitely read The Edge of Sanity as a standalone but it's well worth reading Enter the Dark to understand the background of some of the characters and to fully experience 'The Red Room' that is touched upon in this book.

There is a lot going on in this book which really helped to hold my interest; from kidnapping to human guinea pigs and a huge dollop of revenge that really upped the ante in the anything-could-happen stakes.  Chris Thomas has an amazing ability to describe his scenes of torture and brutality in just the right level of detail to get my stomach heaving.  That sounds bad but it's a good thing; it shows how invested I was in the book that I felt every kick, punch, bite and cut.  If it was a film I would have closed my eyes in horror but I really couldn't tear my eyes away from this wonderfully dark book.

The Edge of Sanity is so realistic that I can totally imagine it happening in real life as junkies look for a bigger and better fix.  As they search for their next fix, they have no idea that someone has invented a drug that will rid humanity of drug users whilst at the same time giving these drug users not only the best, but the last, high of their life.  Complete the trials to enter the dark web and place your bid now to buy this genocidal wonder-drug.

Fast-paced, gruesome and very dark, The Edge of Sanity is so scarily realistic that it both sickens and thrills.

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:

Buy it from Amazon



About the author:


Chris Thomas was born near London in 1978 before moving to Buckinghamshire a few months later. He attended the University of Bristol, graduating with a degree in psychology in 1999. It was here that he developed his interest in criminal psychology and serial killers.

After a brief stint working at an investment bank in London, he left the City to work for his wife’s family business, a position he still holds.

Chris is an avid film fan, especially horror, thrillers and dark comedy- something that he tries to blend in his writing. He self-published his debut novel The Red Room in February 2017 before joining the Bloodhound Books stable and re-releasing the book as Enter The Dark.

The follow up, “The Edge of Sanity”, will be released by Bloodhound Books in August 2018.

In his spare time, Chris enjoys karate (holding a black belt) and spending time with his wife and two young daughters.





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Sunday, 12 August 2018

BLOG TOUR: The Psychology of Time Travel - Kate Mascarenhas


1967: Four female scientists invent a time-travel machine. They are on the cusp of fame: the pioneers who opened the world to new possibilities. But then one of them suffers a breakdown and puts the whole project in peril...  

2017: Ruby knows her beloved Granny Bee was the pioneer that went mad, but they never talk about it. Then they receive a message from the future – a newspaper clipping reporting the mysterious death of an elderly lady...  

2018: When Odette discovered the body she went into shock. But when the inquest fails to answer any of her questions, Odette is left frustrated. Who is this dead woman that haunts her dreams? And why is everyone determined to cover up her murder? 


What did I think?

The first thing that struck me about The Psychology of Time Travel was the absolutely beautiful cover; it looks like it has been embroidered and I couldn't stop myself running my fingers over to see if I could actually feel the stitches (I couldn't but it didn't stop me from trying).  As impressive as the cover is, what awaits inside is a stunning, vividly imagined story.

The three different timelines mentioned in the synopsis, don't even begin to portray the timespan of the novel, for the pioneers can time travel to any year between 1967 and 2267.  It does take a little getting used to that each scientist can encounter several different versions of themselves without threatening their very existence, which did make me think about the many preconceptions we have about time travel and ultimately nobody really knows what would happen...unless someone has made a time machine and kept it secret.

As well as the time travel there is a very intriguing mystery to solve when Odette finds a body in a locked room on the first day of her new job.  To unearth the mystery we must travel through time to find out who the victim was, who killed them and how they did it.  This is all paced perfectly as we begin to understand the nuances of time travel as Kate Mascarenhas imagines it.  

Ruby's story is simply perfect; hers is a love story that is utterly timeless.  Ruby is the granddaughter of Barbara, the time travelling pioneer who had a breakdown on live tv.  When Ruby receives messages from the future, it awakens Granny Bee's love of time travel and I could feel her enthusiasm through every written word.  On a personal level, Ruby is the third person in Ginger's marriage until Ruby's one true love appears in her life, just like fate had planned it.

Mystery, intrigue and innovation abound in this imaginative, intelligent and remarkable debut.  You really won't have read anything like it before!

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:


Buy it from Amazon




About the author:


Kate Mascarenhas is a half-Irish, half-Seychellois midlander. She is a qualified child psychologist, dabbling in doll-making and bookbinding in her free time. She lives with her husband in a small terraced house, which she is slowly filling with Sindy dolls.  This is her first novel. 












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Saturday, 11 August 2018

BLOG TOUR: Bad (Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know Trilogy) - ChloƩ Esposito


She stole the life she wanted. Now someone wants to steal it back . . . 

Alvie Knightly may be waking up in the Ritz, but her life is no bed of roses.

Firstly, she has the mother of all hangovers.

Secondly, her beautiful, spoiled twin sister Beth has just been found dead in Sicily - and the police want Alvie for questioning.

And thirdly, Alvie's hot new boyfriend has vanished with every penny of the millions they stole from Beth.

But he picked the wrong girl to mess with.

Alvie will pursue her ex to Rome in a game of cat and mouse that only one of them can survive.
Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned . . .

But can Alvie get revenge before her crimes catch up with her? 

What did I think?

If I had known that this was the second book in a trilogy, I wouldn't have picked it up but thank goodness I didn't realise this because I have never had as much fun reading a book in all my life.  I think I laughed most of the way through it, often sniggering like a schoolgirl and noting down some of the hilarious names that Alvie calls her boyfriend.  So, as I enjoyed it so much, you clearly can read this book as a standalone and I never felt at a disadvantage at all as there is a quick recap of what happened in the first book to fill in all of the blanks for readers jumping in at book two.

Alvie Knightly is on the run after the suspicious death of her sister, Betta, so she has a really great idea to steal her twin sister's identity.  The police aren't looking for a dead woman, are they?  After getting double crossed by her boyfriend, Nino, Alvie vows revenge and tracks him to Rome - it's fortunate that she installed that tracker on his phone, isn't it?  The scrapes that Alvie gets into along the way had me roaring with laughter and I'm even tittering away now as I think of them.  She is one crazy woman and she's not afraid to go after what she wants...and snatch it from whoever has it, like a spoilt child.

I'm not going to mention the hilarious things that happen, but I have to say that Alvie's decision to get a tattoo and the subsequent inking was one of the funniest things I have ever read.  Whilst a lot of the book is funny, it is also often quite steamy and the sex scenes were a little descriptive for my delicate disposition.  It's par for the course in this type of book so it's to be expected and Alvie is such an extreme character that you never know what, or who, she's going to do next.  There's a lot more to this book than the steamy scenes so I'm loathe to call it 'trashy', however, my fairy godsister loves a trashy novel and I think she will absolutely love this; I'll be passing my copy her way to see what she thinks of it.

Alvie's crime capers almost have a slapstick feel to them which lulled me into a false sense of security, so I got quite a rude awakening at the end...which leads nicely on to book 3.  I'm definitely going to pick up the first book in the series, Mad, to see exactly what Alvie got up to in Sicily and I'm looking forward to reading the final book in the trilogy, Dangerous to Know, when it is released in October.

Full of side-splitting hilarity, Bad is the perfect book to take on holiday this year but be prepared for some funny looks as you won't be able to contain your laughter!  

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:


Buy it from Amazon


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Monday, 6 August 2018

BLOG BLITZ: No Place Like Home - Rebecca Muddiman


What would you do if you came home to find someone in your house?

This is the predicament Polly Cooke faces when she returns to her new home. The first weeks in the house had been idyllic, but soon Jacob, a local man, is watching her.

What does he want and why is he so obsessed with Polly?

In a situation where nothing is what it seems, you might end up regretting letting some people in.


What did I think?

As she is a local North East author, I've wanted to read a Rebecca Muddiman book for a while so I jumped at the chance to read her fifth novel, No Place Like Home.  It took me a little while to get into the book, as the chapters seemed to jump between timelines without notice, but once the pieces started to fall into place I realised what a clever book this is.

I think as readers we are perhaps a little spoiled by having 'then' and 'now' labelled on chapters; sometimes it's obvious and other times it's not.  Well, No Place Like Home falls into the latter category but once you get into the rhythm of the book it does become easier to spot...so bear with it, readers!  I have to be honest and say that I didn't have a clue what the heck was going on at first but I was definitely intrigued enough to find out.  

Polly returns to her new home one evening to find someone in her house; her fear turns to anger as she recognises the intruder when he puts the light on.  We then jump back a few weeks to around the time she moved in and she notices somebody across the street watching her as she draws her curtains for the night.  I hate the thought of being watched without my knowledge so I totally empathised with Polly; she should feel safe and secure in her own home, not threatened and afraid.

When we find out that the man watching her is Jacob, an old schoolfriend of Polly's, I could feel my interest levels going up a notch.  They weren't exactly friends at school but when they run into each other years later, Polly is too nice to say no to befriending Jacob...and Jacob doesn't want to be 'just friends'.  I really felt for Polly when she tells one of those little white lies we often tell people to avoid hurting their feelings, only it means a lot more to them than we realise.  I was thinking 'uh-oh, she's said the wrong thing there' as green for go flashed in Jacob's mind.

Now I can't say too much else about the plot without giving the game away, but I just have to say that I have never been more wrong about a character in my whole reading life.  The feelings I had towards this character did a complete 180 as Rebecca Muddiman shows us how very deceptive appearances can be.

No Place Like Home is sinister, unnerving, creepy and utterly surprising.  I felt as if Rebecca Muddiman had got inside my head and pulled all the right strings before revealing how very manipulated I had  been.  Well played, Ms Muddiman!

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion.

My rating:

Buy it from Amazon



About the author:
Rebecca Muddiman was born and raised in the North East and worked in the NHS for many years. She has published four crime novels – Stolen, Gone, Tell Me Lies, and Murder in Slow Motion. Stolen won a Northern Writers Award in 2010 and the Northern Crime Competition in 2012. She is also a screenwriter and was selected for the London Screenwriters Festival Talent Campus in 2016.
Most of her spare time is spent re-watching Game of Thrones, trying to learn Danish, and dealing with two unruly dogs. Sometimes all at the same time.

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